1. tyleroakley:

    I never want to forget that quote.

    (Source: waltzingwithfire, via samipanduh)

     

  2. youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

    angrymuslimah:

    "Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

    this is too thug not to reblog

    (via maghrabiyya)

     

  3. Imagine a film such as Inception with an entire cast of black people – do you think it would be successful? Would people watch it? But no one questions the fact that everyone’s white. That’s what we have to change. - Idris Elba

    (Source: michonnes, via samipanduh)

     

  4. noflowershere:

    A photo I took of beautiful Sophia from last summer’s Dyke March in Montreal, QC

    (via motherflippinmoss)

     

  5. Beyoncé BEYONCÉ

    (Source: arrtpop, via samipanduh)

     

  6. tedx:

    "The goal is not to turn kids into your kind of adult, but rather, better adults than you have been. Progress happens because new generations grow and develop and become better than the previous ones.”

    From Adora Svitak’s talkWhat adults can learn from kids.” In her talk, Adora makes a case for why adults shouldn’t underestimate kids. And they shouldn’t. Kids are doing amazing things. Let’s just take a second to think about how Adora organized her first TEDxYouth event when she was just 12.

    This weekend, young people around the world are attending, organizing, speaking at, and watching TEDxYouthDay events — TEDx events dedicated to the ingenuity of kids worldwide. Every year we’re taken aback by the amazing things that come out of these events, and we think you should be, too. Find a TEDxYouthDay event near you to attend or watch live online here.

    (via maghrabiyya)

     

  7. itsjustjustine:

    purifiedd-:

    ilovemyskinbeauty:

    o-bsolet-ex3eextortion:

    “this leaves men confused and unable to pigeonhole you. What they are forced to do instead is… take you seriously.”

    Reblog every time

    Whoever wrote this dialogue is a freakin’ genius

    What is this from?

    did some research and it’s from “Syrup,” which looks to be a movie that came out this year. also it’s on netflix. 

    (Source: un-usuall-m3mory-x3, via libdise)

     

  8. And then, you ask me whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all… whether I approve of guns.

    I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama!

    Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs! Bombs that were planted by racists. I remember from the time - I was very small - I remember the sound of bombs exploding across the street, our house shaking! I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times because of that fact that any moment - someone - we might expect to be attacked.

    The man who was in that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bill Connor. He would often get on the radio and make statements like - “Niggers have moved into an all white neighborhood, we better expect some bloodshed tonight,” and sure enough there would be blood shed.

    After the four girls - one of them lived next door to me - I was very good friends of a sister of another one… My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class.

    In fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of the young girl called my mother and said - “Can you take me down to the church and pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.”

    And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place.

    And then after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again. ❞ Angela Davis on Violence [x]

    (Source: classicalallure, via motherflippinmoss)

     


  9.  

  10. nickimlnaj:

    unapologetically-yellow:

    On role models

    So often people talk about what terrible role models Rihanna and Nicki Minaj are, and what great role models Selena Gomez and Taylor Swift are. To which I have to say…really?

    Taylor Swift writes most of her songs about men she’s dated. She is cunning and saavy, especially when it comes to manipulating the media, but she hides that in order to maintain her sweet, “all-American” image. Selena Gomez is most famous for her relationship with Justin Beiber. 

    Rihanna has long maintained that she does not want to be a role model. She is young and living her life, and she owns her mistakes. She is unapologetic about her success. Nicki Minaj, whether on Twitter or in interviews, constantly reminds girls to succeed in school. She has made it clear that she is first and foremost a businesswoman looking after her family. After being betrayed and raped by ex-boyfriends, she has remained single for the past ten years. She started writing rhymes and rapping as a means to cope with her life, and she was eventually discovered when she posted her music on MySpace. Her life story is one of resilience and perseverance despite the odds. 

    The problem isn’t that Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez are role models. The problem is that we don’t allow women to be complex. We don’t allow different women with different life stories to be considered role models because we fear that complexity. God forbid they define their lives in terms other than men. 

    Amen.

    (via maghrabiyya)

     

  11. descentintotyranny:

    16-year-old boy thrown into one of the most violent prisons in the country for three years before being released with no charges

    Nov. 20 2013

    Bronx resident Kalief Browder was walking home from a party when he was abruptly arrested by New York City police officers on May 14, 2010. A complete stranger said Browder had robbed him a few weeks earlier and, consequently, changed the 16-year-old’s life forever.

    Browder was imprisoned for three years before the charges were dropped in June 2013, according to a WABC-TV Eyewitness News investigation.

    At the time of the teen’s arrest, Browder’s family was unable to pay the $10,000 bail. He was placed in the infamously violent Rikers Island correctional facility, where he remained until earlier this year.

    Now that he’s free, the young man is speaking up about his experience.

    "I spent three New Year’s in there, three birthdays…," Browder, now 20, said in a recent interview with WABC, adding that he was released with "no apology."

    In October, Browder filed a civil lawsuit against the Bronx District Attorney, City of New York, the New York City Police Department, the New York City Department of Corrections and a number of state-employed individuals.

    The official complaint states Browder was “physically assaulted and beaten” by officers and other inmates during his time at Rikers Island. The document also maintains the accused was “placed in solitary confinement for more than 400 days” and was “deprived meals.” In addition, officers allegedly prevented him from pursuing his education. Browder attempted suicide at least six times.

    In an interview with The Huffington Post, Browder’s current lawyer Paul Prestia summarized his client’s experience as “inexplicable” and “unheard of.” Based off one man’s identification, Browder was charged with robbery in the second degree, he notes. It took three years to dismiss these charges, even though it was, in Prestia’s words, a “straightforward case to try.”

    "The city needs to be held accountable for what happened," Prestia said. "[Browder] had a right to a fair and speedy trail, and he wasn’t afforded any of that. He maintained his innocence the entire time, and essentially got a three year sentence for that."

    Still, when Browder was offered a plea deal in January, he refused to take it, because he did not want to plead guilty to the crime, WABC-TV notes. (Had Browder been tried in a timely fashion and pled guilty to the crime, Prestia told HuffPost, he might have spent less time in prison.)

    Prestia adds that his client has suffered lingering mental health problems, and though he’s currently going to school for his GED, he’s “clearly way behind from where he would have been.”

    "We need someone to be held accountable," Prestia said. "This can’t just go unnoticed. To the extent that [Browder] can be financially compensated — although it’s not going to get those years back for him — it may give him a chance to succeed."

    The District Attorney’s office said it was unable to comment, as Browder’s allegations are currently the subject of ongoing litigation.

    Incidentally, Browder’s claims about his experience at Rikers Island are consistent with findings from a recent report commissioned by the New York City Board of Correction. The report, obtained by The Associated Press, notes that the use of force by prison staff has more than tripled from 2004 to 2013, from seven incidents of force per 100 inmates, to almost 25. Additionally, the number of self-mutilation and suicide attempts by Rikers inmates have increased by 75 percent from 2007 to 2012. According to the report, 40 percent of the city jail’s 12,200 inmates are mentally ill, and many of these inmates are placed in solitary confinement “holes” as punishment.

    (via samipanduh)

     
     

  12. thechanelmuse:

    Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen by Moneta Sleet, Jr.

    (via maghrabiyya)

     

  13. (Source: gym-buddies)

     

  14. neptunespresenttheclones:

    high-rollin:

    duchesssx:

    desertmanian:

    African American doctors attempting to save the life of a Klu Klux Klan member:

    This photo left me speechless, this is what respect is. 

    this is what grace is

    oh….shit..

    wow…

    I never scroll pass this photo.. This is humanity, a lot of people can learn from this picture.

    (via samipanduh)

     

  15. knickied:

    lovesexandrelationships:

    I will ALWAYS promote the positive in black men afterall there are thousands of places you can find the negative!

    They’re also damn near invisible in the lives of black children. 

    (via maghrabiyya)